Norman John Boorman  

Servicenumber : 1580835
Rank : Serjeant
Regiment : The Glider Pilot Regiment
Unit : 2nd Wing
Date of Death : 18-09-1944
Age : 29
Grave : Plot 5. Row A. Grave 1. 
Norman John  Boorman was a son of William Henry and Fanny Kate Boorman. He was married to Mollie Ethel Boorman of Welling, Kent.
Boorman served with E Squadron. According to the Roll of Honour published by the Society of Friends of the Airborne Museum (Jan Hey 1999 and 2011) Boorman's Horsa glider (CN 221) landed in the trees, fatally injuring the pilots (Boorman and Joseph Lee), near LZ-S (north west of Wolfheze) on 17 september 1944. Lee died instantly and was buried in the Onder de Bomen General Cemetery at Renkum. Boorman was brought to the Schoonoord Hotel, where he died of his wounds. He was given a field burial near the Schoonoord Hotel at Oosterbeek.
In the book 'Glider Pilots at Arnhem' (Mike Peters and Luuk Buist 2009) Sergeant George Barton of the 7th Battalion KOSB, who was a passenger in glider CN 221, is quoted about what happened (page 86): 'I felt the glider attempt to suddenly make a climbing movement, and then the big bang and everything came to a stop. When I came to my senses I realised we had landed in the trees, with the tail standing in the air. I had to jump about 15 feet to the ground along with my driver. The two pilots were either dead then or unconcious. I had orders to leave them for the medical team and it was also obvious we couldn't get out the jeep and gun. I later heard the pilots, Warrent Officer Lee and Sergeant Boorman, died from their injuries'.
Sergeant Barton is also quoted in the book 'Off at last' (Robert N. Sigmond 1997) about the same crash (page 54 and 55): 'I took off in glider No 221 from Down Ampney with my Jeep driver Henry McClusky and our 6 pounder anti-tank gun, Jeep, ammunition and supplies necesary. We took of at about 0940 hrs and arrived at the Landing Zone about 1340 hrs. The landing ended in disaster. I was sitting in the rear of the glider with Henry when the tow rope was released and we started to descend rather rapidly when I felt the glider suddenly attempt to make a climbing movement, then the big bang and everything came to a stop. When I came to my senses I realized we had landed in the trees with the tail standing up in the air. I had to jump about four yards to the ground along with my driver. The two pilots were either dead or unconsious. I had orders to leaver them for the medical team and it was also obvious we couldn't get out the Jeep and gun. I later heard the two pilots, Lee and Lawson, died from injuries. Also the Jeep and gun were recovered although I never saw them again or heard who actually used them.'
Picture: 23-09-2012
 
Sources:Roll of Honour, Glider Pilots at Arnhem (Thanks to Mike Peters who gave permission for using the info) and Off at Last (Thanks to Robert Sigmond who gave permission for using the info), website CWGC.  

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